Dave Alvin ( with guest, Christy McWilson )

Dave Alvin ( with guest, Christy McWilson )

Oct 12, 2012 |  0 comments
Date: Oct 12, 2012 Time: 8 pm Price: $25 in advance, $30 day of show Type: Rock and Roll

The rules Dave Alvin has followed throughout his 24 years as a solo artist were discarded during the creation of his 11th album, Eleven Eleven.
For the first time in his career he wrote songs while touring and recorded during breaks on his tours in 2010 with the Guilty Women. He used
musicians he had not recorded with since his days in the Blasters, and for the first time ever, he sang on a record with his brother Phil, the lead
singer of the Blasters. “While we were growing up there was a firm line between Phil and me,”  Dave says, referring to Blasters’ division of labor: Phil sang, Dave wrote the songs and played lead guitar. “The main reason I decided to have him sing with me was that we’re not going to be here forever; we might as  well have fun. Life is too short.”

The heart beats a little faster at the thought of The Blasters in their prime, that brief moment when they were by some distance the flat-out most exciting rock’n’roll band a lot of us have ever seen. Dave Alvin was their incendiary lead guitarist and songwriter, his vocalist brother Phil, who formed the band with Dave in the blue-collar East Los Angeles suburb of Downey, their grandstanding front man. The chemistry between them was often as dangerously volatile as their music – a sensational mix of blues, rockabilly, R’n’B and rock’n’roll – and their increasingly fractious relationship meant the band’s career was incredibly lively when it lasted, but woefully short-lived. They did as much as, say, REM, The Replacements and Hüsker Dü to revitalise American music in the early ’80s. They split, though, in 1985, after just four albums. For a while after he quit his own band, Alvin played guitar with X, hooked up briefly with The Gun Club and recorded some still-unreleased sessions with Bob Dylan before making his solo debut with 1987’s admittedly tentative Romeo’s Escape (re-titled Every Night About This Time in the UK). He really hit his stride, however, with 1994’s King Of America and the mostly acoustic folk-blues of 1998’s Blackjack David, for which he should probably have won the Grammy he got for 2000’s Public Domain: Songs From The Wild Land, which drew on a rich heritage of traditional American music in a manner that anticipated Springsteen’s 2006 album The Seeger Sessions.
Eleven Eleven is Alvin’s first album of original new material since Ashgrove, seven years ago, and mixes to great effect the rowdy road-house blues of his work with regular touring band The Guilty Men and the more poised and reflective Blackjack David, revisiting along the way many of the themes he’s remained constant to over the years. “The songs are all about life, love, death, loss, money, justice, labour, faith, doubt, family and friendship. The usual stuff,” he says of Eleven Eleven, which unfolds like a series of road movies, vivid vignettes, episodes from distressed lives, real and imagined.

visit his website: http://www.davealvin.net/home.html

Joining Dave will be Christy McWilson: http://www.christymcwilson.com/

Leave a Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *